NEWS

IETA UK & Ireland AGM – 25 October 2017

All IETA UK & Ireland members are invited to our Annual General Meeting Notice of Annual General Meeting 2017 – issued 25 September 2017 via mailchimp.  If you did not receive your copy please contact  the Committee Secretary, details below, or Liz in admin. Date: Wednesday 25 October 2017 Time: 8.00 pm (GMT) Via: Telephone Conference Call A new committee will stand for election at the AGM and each member attending the meeting is entitled to a single vote. Forms for nominations for committee members and requests for Any Other Business (AOB) were issued 25 September 2017 Should you wish to stand on the committee but do not have anyone to second your nomination then please return the nomination form and we will happily discuss your application. For admin purposes all members are asked to confirm in advance their intention (or not) to “ring in” and attend. Contact committee secretary: moira.richardson@hotmail.co.uk A reminder will be sent out to those wishing to attend at the start of the AGM week. Agenda: 1. Apologies 2. Minutes of Last AGM – to be issued and read prior to the meeting 3. Chairperson’s Report – to be issued and read prior to the meeting 4. Treasurer’s Report – to be issued and read prior to the meeting 5. Election of New Committee (to stand from 1st November 2017 to 31st October 2018) 6. AOB Kindest Regards Sue Falber For and on behalf of IETA-UK & IRELAND

Equine Touch & Equine Facilitated Learning Special Event Report

Brilliant day for us. The Equine Touch (ET) met Equine Facilitated Learning (EFL) with a sharing of practice on 19 August 2017. ET instructor Lyn Palmer introduced ET for EFL practitioners (and did some human body balances); then took ET practitioners for their Ongoing Professional Development. Whilst Paintedhorse introduced EFL to ET practitioners; then explored Equine ReWilding with the EFL group. We had an absolutely brilliant day, thanks to all who attended, beautiful energies, minds and hearts. This was Logan and Epona’s first workshop with people and it was just heartwarming to watch them interact with you. If you couldn’t make today but are interested, Lyn’s workshop dates for Level 1 Equine Touch are on her website (uk.theequinetouch.net), and for those interested in Equine ReWilding our taster sessions are on our website https://paintedhorse.org.uk/.   Lyn Palmer It was really a brilliant day – we learnt a lot from each other and laughed even more – we have so much in common! The EFL people nearly all had herds of horses working for people – I think we will see more than a couple of people from yesterday attending ET classes in the near future to learn to support their horses in their work 🙂

International Equine Touch Day – 25 July 2017

International Equine Touch Day – 25 July 2017

Every year, International Equine Touch Day celebrates our founder Jock Ruddock’s birthday.  Put the 25 July 2017 in your diary NOW.  Make a special note to use ET, VHT and/or CT on that day and appreciate the tremendous gift he has taught us all to share with others. Celebration of this day can be just you and someone special or why not contact your closest UK & Ireland Area Coordinators 2017 and arrange a group meet-up around that date to make it a day to remember!  No Area Coordinator in the area?  Get in touch with other students yourself or contact Liz, ietaukandireland@gmail.com to be put in touch with others in your area. Share your day in the IETA UK & Ireland magazine – send stories to Liz or directly to the editor: Equinetouchin@yahoo.co.uk Thought for 25 July 2017 “Link yourself to Heaven and Earth.  Stand in the very centre of the Universe with your heart receptive to the resounding sound of the body through your hands”   Aikido Inspirations – Jock Ruddock 2011   

IETA Conference 2017 – A Weekend to Remember

IETA Conference 2017 – A Weekend to Remember

IETA CONFERENCE 2017 Our Conference this year celebrated 20 Years of Equine Touch.  People travelled from all parts of UK, N Ireland, Germany and even the US to join in this special celebration.  Held this year in Cambridgeshire, at Wood Green Animal Charity, Godmanchester.  A terrific venue with its own conference room and access to outdoor facilities for our two practical sessions.  The staff went out of their way to make us feel very welcome and even ensured the sun shone all week end.   Day One Proceedings opened with a look back at when it all began with Ivana Ruddock-Lange, Jo Fernandes, Lyn Palmer and Emma Knowles taking the lead with a wonderful trip down memory lane.   All attendees received a special magazine with contributions from Jock’s old newsletters and stories invited from the greater ET family. Ivana gifted lovely logo-ed zip pullers to everyone and IETA provided special tee shirts to mark the occasion.           Babette Tegldal (left) spoke about how positive psychology can help us to help others.  Her enthusiastic presentation had us bubbling and keen to try out her suggested strategies.  Deirdre Bruce, an ET and VHT practitioner,  was our next speaker and her talk explained how in her practice she has come across horses that are sensitive/sensitised to energy issues and explained how “energy” may be a contributing factor to the way horses behave and react. Deirdre was followed by Jade Trelease who took us through the importance of  Accuracy, Integrity and Intent and the role it plays in the success of ET sessions and during training. After lunch Bert Sheffield, Canadian Paralympic rider based in the UK, talked about how she had used ET to help get her horse ready for the Rio Olympics 2016.  She finished off her talk with a very polished dressage display to music much appreciated by all. Back indoors, our next talk was from Sarah Schaffner, one of our International Practitioners, who had flown over from Germany to show how she has learnt and uses Daniel Anz’s way of trimming to successfully balance feet in a way that she finds complements the work she does as an Equine Touch practitioner. Saturday closed with the “Mighty Atom” – alias Paula Cuthbert – whose many talents include applied kineseology.  It turns out that Paula was one of the earliest ET students, learning from Jock  during a visit to Zimbabwe early 2000.  She has since relocated to UK and after her talk at this year’s conference we can see why he so aptly named her the Mighty Atom! A large number of the attendees then adjourned to Frankie and Benny’s restaurant for an evening meal with a chance to catch up on the days events and with each other. Day Two Who better to start the second day of our conference than Ivana.  “Lessons from Anatomy” were all to do with tails and tail ends!  Speaking first about the impact “tail end problems” have on the human body, made its transfer to the equine (and even canine body) all too painfully clear.  Once again a terrific insight into understanding how both human and animal bodies can be effected by “dis-ease” in a certain area.  And once again Ivana finding out that many anatomy books are not as accurate as they should be! Cathy Smith introduced a brand new Equine Touch promotional video recorded by her brother Nick Daw, starring herself and Emma Knowles. The video was well received and explains to newcomers what ET is all about.   Sadly our two Canine Touch speakers had to withdraw from the conference leaving a half hour slot which came about as the result of a suggestion made by Jock in a Newsletter back in 2010 where he thought it would be a good idea if a video were made by ETF to help show and give tips on how practitioners and practitioner route students could better present themselves and the modalities in as professional a way as possible.   The role play presented a rather scatty, fumbling VHT inept, an over confident gossip and the perfect model!  Not exactly what Jock and Ivana had in mind but gave plenty of food for thought. Sue Falber, our emcee for the weekend, worked tirelessly throughout the two days, making sure things went smoothly and ran like clockwork.  She even found the time and energy to present a talk on applied kinesiology techniques and how we can help ourselves and our clients deal with emotions and improve self confidence.  Complementing Paula’s presentation from the day before, Sue gave us lots more to think about and try – leaving us all trying to locate our bananas!     Chris Wyllie‘s talk on Making Connections showed how she has come to a better understanding of healing through ET/VHT/CT, and how this has encouraged her to expand her knowledge through making connections initially on a physical level, then bringing in emotional, mental and finally spiritual understanding.           After lunch we headed outside where Sue King and her husband had volunteered to be guinea pigs for Becky Chapman, a Biomechanics Coach. Becky put them through their paces to help illustrate how the rider’s position and effectiveness impacts on the horse’s performance and on the soundness (emotional and physical) of both. Incidentally, Becky had agreed to present at this year’s conference before it was discovered that in 2004 Jock had mentioned her and the use of mechanical Strider in a VHT experiment where Strider was used to measure the rider’s position before and after a VHT session.  A rather unexpected deja vu moment linking past and present! Last but not least our closing talk was all about the work done at Wood Green Animal Charity.  As with many Animal Charities, Wood Green relies on public donations to enable them to do all that they do.  Some of the stories we heard were heart breaking but all showed clearly the commitment and desire the staff have to give animals in their care a brighter, happier and healthier future.   So ends yet another great conference!   A big thank you to all involved in making the weekend such a great success.  Special mention to all our presenters, members and visitors from far and wide and the Wood Green Charity staff.  This event could not have happened without conference organiser Mary Bromfield, IETA Committee and of course Sue Falber whose contribution over the weekend was exceptional. Thank you all for your comments and feed back after the conference.  Sharing this one from Ginny Gaunt (right) posted on ET Face Book Addicts: “I know Babette has already posted but as a student and complete newbie to the “woo-woo” stuff I just wanted to thank you all so much. I had no idea what to expect from the conference and going places on your own can be daunting but I was made to feel so welcome and included, I was never once left sitting on my own with no one to talk to and I can honestly say that’s a first for me in doing things solo. The talks were fantastic and inspiring and clearly a lot of hard work had gone in to each and every one of them. It was lovely to put faces to names and I can’t wait for next year! Here I am visiting a friends yard…

Helping Put a Swing Back in a Horse’s Step

Helping Put a Swing Back in a Horse’s Step

   Horses tend to be long-suffering animals and it can often be hard to tell if they are in pain until it has been relieved and the horse re-discovers its correct way of moving or behavioural issues disappear.    Vets, physios, farriers, dentists and a myriad of other horse specialists and therapists can all have a part to play in the welfare of a much-loved pet, and in many situations, it is a case of trial and error to see what works for you and your horse.     Audrey Anderson, currently the only Equine Touch tutor and practitioner in Scotland is based at Bankfoot and has successfully worked on horses from the Borders to Aberdeenshire, with a facebook page full of comments testifying what a difference she has made to equines across the country.    The Equine Touch is a non-diagnostic, non-invasive Equine Bodywork system which is an holistic soft tissue address, effecting mostly connective tissue – muscles and tendons, joint capsules and ligaments using a very specific move.    It was developed in the late 1990’s by Scotsman, Jock Ruddock  and is now one of the largest Equine Bodywork discipline taught and practiced in the UK with large numbers of students attending equine touch clinics at all levels each year.    Audrey went on her first Equine Touch course eight years ago to try to help her own horse which had had an accident and no treatment was working. Within two days he was walking normally, so she continued to study and began practicing four years ago.    She said, “Equine Touch can help any horse; young, old, performance horses, eventing, dressage, carriage driving, show-jumping, recovering from illness, injury, on box rest and many other issues. We have found it can help with reducing the pain spiral, improving relaxation, encouraging muscle tone as well as aiding recovery from injury, trauma and atrophy.”      Audrey also finds the procedure helps with stress and emotional trauma, minimising behavioural issues and strengthening the immune system.       Clients are requested to fill out a questionnaire about their horse before an appointment and they should receive permission from their vet before Audrey will visit. She also leaves clients with a list of recommended stretching exercises for them to do with their horse, which encourages the tissue to elongate following a session.    She said, “Appointments are for as long as they take, and every one is different, although an hour and a half is usually about right.” She finds that three sessions is often enough to help but most clients come back for maintenance check-ups on a regular basis.    Audrey also offers a “Pre-race tune-up” where she will go to an event and check the horse over 10 to 20 minutes before a competition.    Equine Touch is not a therapy or treatment and Audrey is quick to point out that it is not an alternative or replacement for allopathic medicine. However, as many clients have testified, it works and can often complement other treatments or therapies. This article, by Erika Hay, appeared in the Courier & Advertiser, Saturday April 1 2017  

20 Years of Equine Touch – Special Story from Poland

20 Years of Equine Touch – Special  Story from Poland

Equine Touch Returns to Poland Some years after Lyn Palmer taught the first Equine Touch class in Poland a request was made by Alina Palichleb to run host another level 1 course. Naturally the answer was yes as we all know how much we enjoy spreading the love and benefits of Equine Touch. After some great promotional work from Alina, which included having an ET stand at a horse expo in Poland she was able to gather together 10 students to learn ET. This was a great achievement and one Alina hopes to continue in Poland. As Lyn was unable to teach the course Emma Knowles was asked, as Emma has previous experience of teaching through a translator. The course took place 10 – 12 March 2017 at a wonderful centre to the south of Krakow.  One of the students was the manager for the centre and what a great venue it was for ET – plenty of space for the human work, lots of horses to learn on, accommodation and fantastic Polish food. The feedback from both the students and horses throughout the three days was incredible and it was fantastic to see many of the students were already established practitioner in other therapies yet were very keen to learn how ET could further help the horses they work with. We are hoping to return to Poland later this year. Here’s a little story we would like to share with you from one of the students – Marta. This was sent to us a few days after the Equine Touch course: I went on a foot trimming course and whilst there asked the vet who was running the course if I could do some Equine Touch on her old mare. The vet was unsure when I asked and said that she massaged her own horses so they would be ok. But fifteen minutes later the vet approached me and said, ‘yes you can do it but I warn you now my mare swells afterwards and she doesn’t like this therapy’. I said, ‘the mare will not swell as she will be yawning’ to which the vet replied, ‘the mare almost never yawns.’ I was fresh from her ET course and said ‘oh she will’ 😊 I think that Jock must have been by my side as I would not normally have replied in this way. I started with the ET branding to which the vet said, ‘not so fast’ this helped me to slow down. Then doing the BBB next after only a few moves, yep you guessed it the mare was yawning a LOT!!! I completed the BBB and sometimes felt I hit the spots and that I missed a few but the old mare gave me plenty of feedback – shaking her head, yawning, coughing, head down, chewing, closing eyes, belly rumblings etc. It was wonderful and I knew the old mare would not stand for anything she didn’t want to. After I had finished the vet came up and said, ‘I thought you were going to do another therapy but it was not what I expected’ smiling broadly. I was very happy because the vet had let me work on her horse and this was a wonderful and intelligent old mare who loved ET 😊 Thank you Equine Touch Love from Poland

20 Years of Equine Touch – Trip Down Memory Lane with Kate Prowse

20 Years of Equine Touch – Trip Down Memory Lane with Kate Prowse

ET and Me I first heard about Equine Touch in October 2004.  To be honest I was quite sceptical.  I could learn how to do a raft of great things; induce deep relaxation, release hypertonic muscles, stimulate the circulation and detox the body and all in a 3-day course!  It sounded grand, but in reality, I actually had no idea what doing even some of these things could mean to a body.  Certainly I did not appreciate the effect it could have on a sensory, living being. Although sceptical. I kept an open mind and decided the only way to find out if it worked was to have a go.  So in January 2005 I managed to get a course together and Lyn and Lara brought ET to Essex for the first time and I did my Level 1.  As host to the course I spent more time worrying about getting milk for tea and finding enough horses to work on than Arrow Heads and Big Ms, but somehow enough must have gone in. At the time, I had 2 horses.  My wonderful first horse Kildair who was then 29 years old and had been with me since he was 6 and, Harry who had been with me for 4 years and was destined for great things, except that we were still struggling with most of the basics.  Kildair had recently become rather rickety and I did not know how to help him.  Struggling with Harry I believed that I was a terrible rider although I did not seem that much worse than many around me and I did have some exams behind me so I could not have been that bad.  For myself, I had suffered with back pain since my mid-teens and in my twenties had over a year when my back was non-functional and I could not stand upright, and I had lived with chronic low grade back pain for about 15 years. With the partial knowledge that I gained on that course and the limited skills I had learnt, I practiced with both horses and within 2 weeks Kildair had changed so much that I got back to gently riding with him.  I began to realise that Harry had deep seated issues which I am still unravelling 12 years later, and amazingly, although my own pain did not go away, it changed.  This was all enough to get me to learn some more.  So, I did. I was a horse person but never set out to become an ET Practitioner and certainly not an ET Instructor.  I never even considered that I could get in to the world of human therapies and help people regain their lives, but somehow that is what has happened.  I meet many people and many horses and without fail I know that with some bodywork together with some attention to posture and way of movement, lasting changes can be made that can improve on quality of life. I have had first sessions when clients have been amazed by the results, but of course there are also those occasions when you question if you were even effective with a body.  As ET and VHT has become integral with my life, it is actually the results and reactions by those closest to me that have meant the most.    Harry knows ET so well having been my main recipient and experiment.  We have made progress and plateaued repeatedly over the years as we have worked with his asymmetry and were in a pretty good place last year, but still in a place of maintenance of a root cause which I now believe to have been a broken pelvis as a youngster.  And then we tried something new which triggered a series of changes that have taken him to another place altogether.  It was not my knowledge or skill that achieved this, but his shear persistence and determination in getting me to touch in the places where he wanted me!!  For much of the last year he has chased me backwards around the stable or field as he wanted me to find my way deep into the many layers of the inner thigh.  Patiently he just would not give up whenever he thought it was worth a try to get me to rub or work his leg.  He would politely but insistently present his back leg to me and carefully move his position to where he wanted my touch to go.  If I got it right he would poke out his top lip, chew and sigh, turn around and nuzzle me, and then turn back to the same or another place to ask for more.  He got me to go places and to a depth that I would never have dared to go had he not leaned on me, followed me and generally nagged at me to keep going.  It could be hard and demanding work, but gradually I began to feel the difference as really stubborn tissue released its hold of a lifetime and soften and let his leg move freely.  Some of these places had been worked by me and others many times before, but somehow Harry knew that it would budge given the right attention. Caspian was a wonderful horse who came to me by chance.  He also was a major rehab case and over the 6 years he was with me taught me so many things.  We did much groundwork together, mostly with him loose in the arena or paddock.  Once we had learnt to dance together, I would coach him to try new ways of using his body and as it was without any force or pressure he soon began to buy into it and explore his way of movement.  On one occasion, we were together in the arena and his block, which we think originated from an incident years before as a 2 or 3 year old, had been working its way along the right side of his body from lumbar region towards the poll.  This process took many months and he would sometimes shake his ears vigorously or stop and rub a part of his neck or ear on the fence.  On this occasion, we were in the arena and he was cantering around me at liberty. At the beginning, a soft and relaxed canter was simply not possible but with controlled and balanced movement, mostly at walk and trot, his canter was getting there.  After a couple of laps, he relaxed further into the pace and he began to push his neck up and down, turn his head to one side and the other, seeming to try and find a release for a stuck bit, grunting gently as he did it.  After trying a few things, still cantering , he looked towards me, turned in towards me, stopped right in front of me and presented a specific place on the right side of his neck.  I did my best to feel and release what I could find.  He yawned.  I suggested he go and try it, so off he went again at canter and explored the new feel of his neck by changing his neck position again. …